Downfall by pride in the cask of amontillado by edgar allen poe

The whole plot deals with the inebriation and, ultimately, the live burial of the antagonist, Fortunato.

Downfall by pride in the cask of amontillado by edgar allen poe

Plot summary[ edit ] Fortunato and Montresor drink in the catacombs. Montresor lures Fortunato into a private wine-tasting excursion by telling him he has obtained a pipe about gallons, [1] litres of what he believes to be a rare vintage of Amontillado. Montresor knows Fortunato will not be able to resist demonstrating his discerning palate for wine and will insist that he taste the amontillado rather than Luchesi who, as he claims, "cannot tell Amontillado from Sherry".

Montresor warns Fortunato, who has a bad cough, of the dampness, and suggests they go back, but Fortunato insists on continuing, claiming that he "shall not die of a cough".

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During their walk, Montresor mentions his family coat of arms: At one point, Fortunato makes an elaborate, grotesque gesture with an upraised wine bottle. When Montresor appears not to recognize the gesture, Fortunato asks, "You are not of the masons? When they come to a nicheMontresor tells his victim that the Amontillado is within.

Fortunato enters drunk and unsuspecting and therefore, does not resist as Montresor quickly chains him to the wall. Montresor reveals brick and mortar, previously hidden among the bones nearby, and proceeds to wall up the niche using his trowel, entombing his friend alive.

At first, Fortunato, who sobers up faster than Montresor anticipated, shakes the chains, trying to escape. Fortunato then screams for help, but Montresor mocks his cries, knowing nobody can hear them.

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Fortunato laughs weakly and tries to pretend that he is the subject of a joke and that people will be waiting for him including the Lady Fortunato. Before placing the last stone, he drops a burning torch through the gap.

He claims that he feels sick at heart, but dismisses this reaction as an effect of the dampness of the catacombs.

Downfall by pride in the cask of amontillado by edgar allen poe

Publication history[ edit ] Montresor walling up Fortunato. Without a detective in the story, it is up to the reader to solve the mystery. Many commentators conclude that, lacking significant reason, Montresor must be insanethough even this is questionable because of the intricate details of the plot.

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It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong". After Fortunato is chained to the wall and nearly entombed alive, Montresor merely mocks and mimics him, rather than disclosing to Fortunato the reasons behind his exacting revenge.

Montresor may not have been entirely certain of the exact nature of the insults for which he expected Fortunato to atone. His house had once been noble and respected, but has fallen slightly in status.

Montresor even imparts this blame to Fortunato when he states, "You are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are happy, as once I was".Jun 13,  · Herein lies a detailed analysis of Edgar Allen Poe's famous short story "The Cask of Amontillado." This story of a vengeful murder is still popular today, even years after it was urbanagricultureinitiative.coms: The Cask of Amontillado The story “The Cask of Amontillado” written by Edgar Allen Poe, communicates his theme that pride leads to a man’s downfall.

Pride is known as a feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one’s own achievements. It's not that Evil Is urbanagricultureinitiative.com, this is more like "Evil is Intellectual." Evil is smart, wicked, sarcastic with a biting sense of humor.

Evil is smooth and eloquent, if not outright suave. To wrap it up, Edgar Allan Poe's short story 'The Cask of Amontillado' is the story of a man named Montresor who decides to seek revenge against a man named Fortunato, who has insulted him. He. "The Cask of Amontillado" (sometimes spelled "The Casque of Amontillado" [urbanagricultureinitiative.comˈʝa.ðo]) is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the November issue of Godey's Lady's Book.

A summary of “The Cask of Amontillado” () in Edgar Allan Poe's Poe’s Short Stories. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Poe’s Short Stories and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and .

The Cask of Amontillado - Wikipedia