A history of the containment policy in the cold war

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A history of the containment policy in the cold war

News magazine shows the beginnings of American containment policy. Communism was on the march. Soon communist forces dominated the governments of Romania and Bulgaria.

By the fall ofit was clear that the Soviet-backed Lublin regime had complete control of Poland, violating the Yalta promise of free and unfettered elections there.

It was only a matter of time before Hungary and Czechoslovakia fell into the Soviet orbit. Yugoslavia had an independent communist leader named Tito.

When Harry Truman approved the Marshall Plan inhis official statement said, "Few presidents have had the opportunity to sign legislation of such importance. How many dominoes would fall?

United States diplomats saw a continent ravaged by war looking for strong leadership and aid of any sort, providing a climate ripe for revolution. Would the Soviets get all of Germany? Or Italy and France? President Truman was determined to reverse this trend.

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Greece and Turkey were the first nations spiraling into crisis that had not been directly occupied by the Soviet Army. Both countries were on the verge of being taken over by Soviet-backed guerrilla movements.

Truman decided to draw a line in the sand. Within two years the communist threat had passed, and both nations were comfortably in the western sphere of influence. A mid-level diplomat in the State Department named George Kennan proposed the policy of containment.

Since the American people were weary from war and had no desire to send United States troops into Eastern Europe, rolling back the gains of the Red Army would have been impossible. In July a majority of the American public had never even heard of the Marshall Plan.

BBC - GCSE Bitesize: How and why was the USA involved in the Cold War?

But to win passage in Congress, the Truman administration needed strong public support, so it launched a massive public relations campaign. But in places where communism threatened to expand, American aid might prevent a takeover.

By vigorously pursuing this policy, the United States might be able to contain communism within its current borders. The policy became known as the Truman Doctrine, as the President outlined these intentions with his request for monetary aid for Greece and Turkey. The war had ruined crop fields and destroyed infrastructure, leaving most of Europe in dire need.

To avoid antagonizing the Soviet Union, Marshall announced that the purpose of sending aid to Western Europe was completely humanitarian, and even offered aid to the communist states in the east. Marshall proposed that a post-war European aid program be initiated.

Containment and the Marshall Plan [urbanagricultureinitiative.com]

Less than a year later, the Marshall Plan was a reality. The Marshall Plan created an economic miracle in Western Europe. By the target date of the program four years later, Western European industries were producing twice as much as they had been the year before war broke out.

Some Americans grumbled about the costs, but the nation spent more on liquor during the years of the Marshall Plan than they sent overseas to Europe.

A history of the containment policy in the cold war

The aid also produced record levels of trade with American firms, fueling a postwar economic boom in the United States.Oct 27,  · The term 'cold war' first appeared in a essay by the English writer George Orwell called 'You and the Atomic Bomb.' The Cold War: The Atomic Age.

The containment strategy also provided the rationale for . Containment was a foreign policy strategy followed by the United States during the Cold War.

First laid out by George F. Kennan in , Containment stated that communism needed to be contained and isolated, or it would spread to neighboring countries.

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Policy of Containment: America’s Cold War Strategy The Cold War The following article on the Cold War policy of containment is an excerpt from Lee Edwards and Elizabeth Edwards Spalding’s book A Brief History of the Cold War It is available to order now at Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Containment was a foreign policy strategy followed by the United States during the Cold War. First laid out by George F. Kennan in , the policy stated that communism needed to be contained and isolated, or else it would spread to neighboring countries.

Policy of Containment: America’s Cold War Strategy The Cold War The following article on the Cold War policy of containment is an excerpt from Lee Edwards and Elizabeth Edwards Spalding’s book A Brief History of the Cold War It is available to order now at Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

The Cold War and Containment. Truman’s Containment policy was the first major policy during the Cold War and used numerous strategies to .

Containment | foreign policy | urbanagricultureinitiative.com